Kendall Klingbeil Fine and Contemporary Artist
Chelsea opening Article on artinfo.com
NEW YORK—As the sun set over the Hudson River on Wednesday evening, guests at Leap’s annual gala on the Frying Pan, a barge docked at Pier 66 in New York, mingled with artists Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Kenny Scharf, Dennis Oppenheim, and others.
Everyone was there to celebrate the arts education program’s 32nd year. Leap — short for Learning through an Expanded Arts Program — brings artists and experts into schools and museums to work with both staff and students to learn about art and the world around them.

Artist Tom Otterness, who works with students in the program, said Leap is part of the earliest stages of the creation of public art in the city. “It plants the seeds for kids to make public work and look at it and begin to think and debate ideas,” he said.

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Artist Tim Rollins has been teaching art in schools in the South Bronx since 1981 and has seen a number of his former students go on to make careers for themselves in the arts. Rollins’s students named themselves K.O.S., which stands for “Kids of Survival,” and the group’s collaborative artworks made with Rollins have been shown in galleries in New York and Los Angeles. On Wednesday, one of his former students was photographing the Leap event, which the artist said made him proud.

The evening ended with a film about the organization’s programs and a presentation by its Radical Arts Venue and Education Center dancers from Middle School 22 in the Bronx, who performed a poem and dance number for the crowd as the Frying Pan swayed back and forth in the Hudson.

The next night, art world activity remained in the same neighborhood but moved further inland, as Julie Saul Gallery, Michael Steinberg Fine Art, Charles Cowles Gallery, and Mixed Greens launched new exhibitions, as did artist Kendall Klingbeil in a gallery space at 606 West 26th Street.

Click on the photo gallery at left for pictures from the Leap gala and Chelsea openings.

photograph of opening
Chelsea Gallery Opening - Kendall Klingbeil - May 28th 2009 Opening
The Gallery at 606 W. 26th Street, New York, N.Y. 10001

Contact: Bonnie Bieder
or Susan Grissom
914-764-8689

Introducing:

A Collection of New Works by Kendall Klingbeil:
Classic to Contemporary


Opening reception: May 28, 6 to 9 p.m.
Artist in attendance

New paintings by Kendall Klingbeil, described The New York Times as an “energy painter whose works make people feel good,” are on exhibit at 606 W. 26 Street, May 14-June 13.

With the use of new and mixed media — plastics, mica powders, interference paint, paper, gold leaf, oils — Kendall captures nature in the abstract on large canvases and small, using form and color to give voice to the earth.

“I like to base most of my work on nature,” she said. “I try to create something that evokes a perception, or a sense memory.’’

The abstract works are bold in strong palettes, and catch the light and shimmer, changing appearance according to the light and the aspect of the viewer, as in nature itself.

An artist of seemingly endless versatility, Kendall has developed a following not only for her abstracts, but for her landscapes, still lifes, and portraits in oil, some of which are included in this exhibition. Her portraits in glass will be shown in Manhattan later this year.

“I use the technique and materials that best communicate what I am trying to say with each piece,” she said. “Sometimes what I want to evoke requires a realistic treatment, sometimes an abstract one. My abstracts are a natural extension of my classical training. Sometimes the tale is large and so is the canvas. Sometimes, I want to work on a small canvas with myriad detail.”

Meet Kendall at the gallery on Thursdays from 3 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. (Perhaps you’ll see the artist at work.) The gallery is also open Fridays and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and by appointment. May 14-June 13th.